SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Brimbal Ave. Opinions

January 17, 2014

Letter: Brimbal Avenue project is 'better for Beverly'

(Continued)

Consistent with this “green” agenda, CEA has brought in Whole Foods, the nation’s leading purveyor of healthy and environmentally sound foods, and will design and build the project so as to receive LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

The Department of Environmental Protection has studied this former landfill extensively and has issued a permit with controls to assure that it may be developed in a perfectly safe and healthy manner.

Under no circumstances will any landfill material be removed from this site.

CEA will retain ownership of the majority of the former landfill and will be responsible for all the remediation costs.

Under no circumstances will Beverly taxpayers bear any responsibility for costs associated with remediation of this former landfill.

Returning this landfill to productive use will generate a minimum of $200,000 per year in additional real estate taxes for the city.

After years of careful study by state and city officials, the Planning Board and City Council concluded that the Brimbal Avenue project was in the best interests of the entire city. Skeptical nearby residents, operating on misunderstandings and misinformation, reject the exhaustive public process that has brought us to this point. They are asking Beverly residents to do something extraordinary: override the Planning Board and City Council, turn down the $5 million state grant, overrule the careful work of several state agencies and, in a word, kill this state-funded transportation improvement project.

Unfortunately, residents are being asked to take this extraordinary step based on inaccurate and misleading information being circulated by the leaders of the North Beverly Neighborhood Association. Residents have been led to believe that a “no” vote would stop development and reduce traffic on Brimbal Avenue That is simply not the case. All a “no” vote will do is prevent Whole Foods from coming to Beverly and jeopardize state funding for much-needed road improvements. These are not exactly noble goals for which to override their elected representatives. Rather, advocacy for a “no” vote reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of the issues that will ultimately harm the interests of the very people who are leading the charge.

Why vote “yes?” Because it’s better for Beverly. All of Beverly. For more accurate information, go to BetterForBeverly.org.

Steven A. Cohen

President

CEA Group

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Local News

Local News
  • 140765_SN_DLE_FESSENDEN4 Special Spaces transforms two downstairs rooms into playroom for Riley Fessenden

    BEVERLY -- What happens when the perfect kid-friendly playroom appears in your house overnight? Beverly's Fessenden kids were mostly speechless when they returned from seeing "The Little Mermaid" on Saturday and got their first look at the playroom t

    July 28, 2014 10 Photos

  • Beverly Hospital courier loses patients’ lab forms

    BEVERLY -- A courier for Beverly Hospital last month lost lab request forms for 54 patients that included names, health insurance identification numbers and, in some cases, Social Security numbers. The courier misplaced the forms, which were in a zip

    July 28, 2014

  • Big plans for three parks in the Point neighborhood SALEM -- One will be overhauled, another created from scratch, and a third will get a spiffed-up community garden. It's a good time to be a park in the Point neighborhood. The densely packed area just south of the city's downtown is on the verge of i

    July 28, 2014

  • Peabody could see school choice profit next year PEABODY -- After three years, the city's schools are projected not only to break even on school choice, but actually make a $30,000 profit. School officials expect to lose just under $300,000 in state aid next year for students who opt to attend scho

    July 28, 2014

  • 140723_SN_DLE_SALVARMY2 Dennis and Susan Knight take over Salem Salvation Army operation

    SALEM -- It was Christmas Eve in Sanford, Maine, but 8-year-old Dennis Knight and his three sisters had good reason to be short on holiday spirit: Their mom and dad had warned them there would be no Christmas that year. The family couldn't afford it.

    July 28, 2014 3 Photos