SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Special Report

September 14, 2011

Charities, nonprofits stand behind 9/11 families

Goodness born from grief of terror attacks

NEW YORK — In the years following the Sept. 11 attacks, charities and funds worldwide sprung up in an effort to provide relief to victims and families affected by the tragedy. While some of these projects met goals and quietly disbanded, many continue, dedicated to assisting those who struggle with the lifelong mental health issues and financial woes stemming from the attacks. Now, 10 years later, these programs still rely on charitable donations from individuals and groups to service those in need.

“It is a common misconception that time heals all wounds,” says Alisha Feltman, event and development manager of Tuesday’s Children, a charity that provides support to families of 9/11 and other global terrorism acts. “Grief is permanent. It changes over time, but it is always present.”

Here are five programs dedicated to providing relief for those suffering from the long-term effects of Sept. 11 and the ways you can help them provide ongoing assistance.

Tuesday’s Children

This family service nonprofit supports the children of Sept. 11 victims, in addition to the victims of terrorist attacks around the world. Tuesday’s Children offers support in the form of mentoring programs, mental health counseling and teen and child support groups. They also offer college assistance and family engagement opportunities. Visit the website to sign up for a newsletter, donate and learn about volunteer opportunities. www.tuesdayschildren.com

Robin Hood Foundation

The Robin Hood Foundation, established in 1988, targets poverty in New York City. Shortly after the 2001 terrorist attacks, the foundation set up a relief fund that assists low-income victims of Sept. 11, including those who lost jobs, loved ones and those in need of mental health services. The funds support programs in the city that help poor New Yorkers. www.robinhood.org

Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund

This fund was established one week after the Sept. 11 attacks to provide for needy participants, including families of those killed or permanently disabled. According to its website, the Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund has already provided more than $55 million in post-secondary education assistance to 1,639 students. Donations to the Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund are made through Scholarship America. www.scholarshipamerica.org

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