SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Election Forum

October 12, 2012

Column: Restoring balance to the Governor's Council

It takes a passionate woman to get people excited about something as obscure as the Governor’s Council. Maura Ciardiello is such a candidate in this otherwise-contentious campaign season, where the public’s imagination is held strongly by seemingly more important races like the congressional, state Senate and presidential races. But for Massachusetts, the Governor’s Council — a virtual political outpost — is important.

The council is composed of eight individuals elected from districts and the lieutenant governor, who serves ex officio. The eight councilors are elected from their respective districts every two years.

The council meets weekly to record advice and consent on warrants for the state treasury, pardons and commutations, and recording advice and consent to gubernatorial appointments such as judges, clerk-magistrates, public administrators, members of the Parole Board, Appellate Tax Board, Industrial Accident Board and Industrial Accident Reviewing Board, notaries, and justices of the peace.

Maura is a graduate of Haverhill High School, a former public school teacher and a mother of three young boys. She is married to a Massachusetts state trooper. When she speaks, she does so plainly about the importance of citizen participation in government. She is the epitome of a no-nonsense, untainted voice in a political landscape that is replete with professional politicians. Her message is a simple one. In Massachusetts, advocating for citizens must be done by citizens. The implication is clear. Massachusetts has a colorful history of corruption and dislocation that threatens the integrity of our political systems, and a balancing force is the citizen-public servant.

Since appointments of key positions such as judges, parole board members and court officials impact our communities tremendously, it’s critical that a voice that stands for balance and compromise is delivered to this council. With only two Republicans currently on the council, balance is lacking when measured by the diverse interests of the two dominant parties in the state.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Election Forum

Local News
  • Salem's Collins seeks longer day

    SALEM -- Collins Middle School may look a little different next year. For starters, longtime Principal Mary Manning, who has headed the school for more than 20 years, is retiring and will be replaced by a new, yet-unnamed principal. More than that, t

    April 19, 2014 6 Stories

  • 140418_SN_KYU_WALK_2 Walking the Walk BEVERLY -- Four hundred thirty walkers, 10.5 miles and $65,000. Those are the numbers you can count on just about every year from the Good Friday Walk. The 35th annual walk produced those figures once again yesterday, with the money going to help nee

    April 19, 2014 2 Photos

  • Marblehead chief charts drop in crime MARBLEHEAD -- Police chief Robert Picariello has highlighted an overall drop in crime from 2012 to 2013 in his annual report to the town. The decrease was substantial in the category of crimes against persons, down 23 percent for incidents like rape,

    April 19, 2014

  • North Shore residents to run in 2014 Boston Marathon

    The Salem News asked those on the North Shore who are running this year's Boston Marathon to share their reasons for running. 

    If you're running the marathon this year, it's not too late to share why you're running. Send a brief paragraph, a photo of yourself and a link to your fundraising site (if applicable) to Cheryl Richardson at crichardson@salemnews.com.

    April 17, 2014

  • One-way school bus passes to get trial run in Peabody PEABODY -- Students will be able to ride the school bus one way next year without paying the price of a round-trip fare. The School Committee has agreed to offer one-way passes on a trial basis following review of transportation data and a proposal f

    April 19, 2014