SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Election Forum

October 13, 2012

Watson: Tisei, Tierney hold very different approaches

The debate on Wednesday between Congressman John Tierney and Republican challenger Richard Tisei illuminated many of the substantive differences between them. (Daniel Fishman, Libertarian candidate, also participated.)

The two major candidates offer voters a real choice. They hold distinctly different analyses of what has caused our economy to crash and then stall; what measures should be taken to revive it; and what role government should play in stimulating economic growth.

They disagree on proposed initiatives to address the increasing costs and long-term viability of Medicare, Medicaid, and the entire health care system.

They disagree on the need for regulating the banks and the financial markets, and for reining in the greed and recklessness that promoted irresponsibility on Wall Street.

I prefer Congressman Tierney’s positions on all of these issues. To start with the state of our economy — the most important issue — Tierney believes that some additional government stimulus is necessary to spur the economy, to increase employment, to increase consumption, and to encourage complementary action in the private sector.

He believes that wise investments can be made in the educational sector, the energy industries, job retraining, and in the repair and modernization of so much of our infrastructure.

These investments and stimuli are needed in the immediate term while longer-term debt reduction plans can also be designed to phase in as the economy becomes stronger.

Mr. Tisei, on the other hand, appears to be against any further government stimulus efforts, and seems hostile to the very idea of public sector jobs. He stated, “The government doesn’t create jobs.” Well, the fact is, it does, along with the private sector.

The reality of our national economy — and the global economy — is that governments and private enterprise together are partners in shaping and determining the complex thing known as the market. It’s not a pure free market — it’s unavoidably a very mixed system.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Election Forum

Local News
  • Whale watching boat snagged by lobster trap rope

    BOSTON (AP) — They weren't castaways, but like the tourists on Gilligan's Island, a group of whale watchers expecting only a three-hour tour got much more after their boat was snagged by a lobster trap rope off Massachusetts and they were forced to spend a long night at sea.

    July 29, 2014

  • Market Basket store managers vow to resign

    Store managers and assistant managers at Market Baskets in the area signed petitions Monday declaring they would work only for Arthur T. Demoulas, no matter who buys the grocery chain. "It was a voluntary petition," Salem store manager Dave Webber sa

    July 29, 2014 1 Story

  • Former law student gets jail term for stealing jewels SALEM -- A former law student who prowled craigslist for people selling diamond jewelry, then robbed them, all while falsely claiming to be a cancer patient, was sent to jail Thursday. Jeffrey Rosenspan, 32, of Walpole, had 10 diamond rings -- as we

    July 29, 2014

  • sculpture Ipswich approaches gift of art cautiously, with good reason

    Art, like beauty, is in the eyes of the beholder. Which is why politicians and public officials often seek to avoid making judgments on public art. A wrong decision can create a furor.

    That might explain the caution of Ipswich selectmen as resident Rick Silverman proposes to honor his late wife and grace the town with an elegant sculpture on the North Green. Treading lightly lest they offend or preemptively reject the offer, they voted last week to set up a board that will advise them on what is and what isn’t welcome in Ipswich’s public spaces.

    July 29, 2014 3 Photos

  • Coal dock rehab beginning this week SALEM -- It's out with the coal and in with the cruise ships. With less than three months until the first cruise ship is expected to arrive, work has begun to repurpose the former coal dock at Salem Harbor Station. The 800-foot-long, deep-water dock

    July 29, 2014