SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

February 21, 2014

Ted Reinstein's New England at Peabody library

By Will Broaddus
Staff writer

---- — Nobody knows New England like Ted Reinstein.

Since 1995, the veteran reporter has traveled to every corner of the region in search of stories for “Chronicle,” the nightly news magazine on WCVB.

Last year, Reinstein published a lot of what he learned on those assignments in his first book, “A New England Notebook: One Reporter, Six States, Uncommon Stories,” which he will discuss at Peabody Institute Library in Peabody at 7 p.m.

“It’s a story collection based on his experience reporting in the area,” said Kelly Rae Unger, director of adult services at the library. “At the program, he’ll be talking about the book, doing a bit of a slide show, and there will be questions and answers, as well.”

There are chapters in the book on the people and places of New England, favorite pastimes of the region and the foods locals eat.

Far from repeating what you already know, Reinstein finds distinctive angles on his topics.

He discusses a family in Campton, N.H., that builds covered bridges and visits the International Cryptozoology Museum in Portland, Maine, which has exhibits on Bigfoot.

He visits places like the oldest baseball diamond in the country, which was built 30 years before Fenway Park and can be found in Clinton.

And Reinstein examines an expense report that Paul Revere submitted to The Colony of Massachusetts Bay “for self and horse,” for the ride he took to spread the news that the British were coming.

The document is in the collection at the Massachusetts State Archives at Columbia Point and includes the government’s response on its reverse side.

The 5 shillings Revere asked for was approved, but his additional request to be reimbursed for printing 1,000 soldiers’ pay notes was not.

“In present-day dollars, Paul Revere’s bill would have come out to roughly $1,081.87,” Reinstein writes. “Still, it seems like a small price to pay for liberty. Besides, you try finding a free messenger at midnight.”