SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Local News

December 6, 2013

Average Salem taxes to rise by $103, $53

SALEM — The property tax bill for the average single-family home is slated to rise $103 after the City Council approved a recommendation from the city assessor’s office last night.

The changes will bring the residential property tax rate to $16.73 per $1,000 of assessed value and the commercial property tax rate to $32.05 per $1,000 of assessed value, according to material provided by the assessor’s office.

The changes mean the tax bill for the average single-family home will rise to $4,768, a 2.2 percent rise, and the bill for the average condominium will rise $53 to $3,612, a roughly 1.5 percent rise. Owners of average two-family properties will be hit harder, with their property taxes rising $217 to $4,694, a 4.8 percent increase.

Over the past year, the assessed value of an average single-family home in Salem just barely rose from $284,800 to $285,000, the average condominium dipped from $217,300 to $215,900 and the average two-family property rose from $273,300 to $280,600, according to the assessor’s office.

In her presentation to the council, Assessor Deborah Jackson noted that 75 percent of the city’s residential property base is composed of single-family homes and condominiums. She also said that 63 percent of single-family homes in Salem — 3,057 out of 4,864 — are worth less than the average value of $285,000, meaning they will see a tax hike of less than $103, and that 53 percent of all condominiums — 2,159 out of 4,066 — fall below the average value of $219,900, meaning their owners will be paying less than the $53 increase.

Jackson further noted that the tax levy she was recommending — $76,981,209 would be raised — was $3.6 million less than levy limit the city was allowed by Proposition 21/2, which caps increases at 2.5 percent, not including new growth.

In a letter to the council supporting the tax hike, Mayor Kimberle y Driscoll said that responsible budgets and spending habits have allowed the city to keep property tax increases for homeowners below the maximum allowed by Proposition 21/2.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Local News

AP Video
Cat Fans Lap Up Feline Film Festival Raw: Lawmakers Scuffle in Ukraine's Parliament The Rock Finds His Inner 'Hercules' Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die Raw: MH17 Passenger Remains in Kharkiv, Ukraine Raw: Israel Hits Gaza Targets, Destroys Mosques ShowBiz Minute: Hoffman, Oberst, Box Office WWII Vet Gets Medals, 70 Years Late Raw: Israel Bombs Multiple Targets in Gaza Veteran Creates Job During High Unemployment Raw: Cargo Craft Undocks From Space Station Widow: Jury Sent Big Tobacco a $23B Message New Orleans Plans to Recycle Cigarette Butts UN Security Council Calls for MH 17 Crash Probe Obama Bestows Medal of Honor on NH Veteran Texas Sending National Guard Troops to Border Hopkins to Pay $190M After Pelvic Exams Taped Foxx Cites Washington 'Circus Mirror' NASA Ceremony Honors Moon Walker Neil Armstrong
Comments Tracker