SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Local News

June 12, 2014

Deal would give Mass. nation-leading $11 minimum wage

BOSTON — The minimum wage in Massachusetts would increase to from $8 an hour to $11 an hour by 2017 under a deal announced Wednesday night by top House and Senate Democrats that would give Massachusetts the highest statewide minimum wage in the country while also reforming unemployment insurance to help employers with stable payrolls save money.

The panel of House and Senate lawmakers negotiating the compromise sealed the deal on Wednesday night, filing a report (S 2195) that would phase in the minimum wage hike by $1 at a time starting in January 2015 when the wage would increase to $9 an hour.

The bill also includes an overhaul of the state's unemployment insurance system, adjusting the rates paid by businesses to cover the cost of benefits for the jobless by smoothing increases to avoid sharp spikes in rates and rewarding employers with stable workforces.

The Senate is expected to vote on the bill when it meets on Thursday, according to a senior Senate staffer.

The compromise excluded a Senate-backed provision that would have indexed future increases in the minimum wage to inflation, a measure that proponents argued to be necessary for wages to keep pace over time with the rising cost of living in Massachusetts.

The House earlier this year rejected indexing, and proposed to raise the minimum wage to $10.50 in line with what organizers behind a ballot petition that could still go before voters have proposed. The ballot petitioners also want to see the wage base indexed to inflation, and it remains to be seen whether the compromise bill with a higher wage will be enough to convince organizers to drop the ballot drive.

The House, which passed an economic development bill 125-23 late Wednesday night, is expected to take up the conference report as soon as next week, according to a House official.

Senate President Therese Murray, who plans to leave the Senate after her term expires in January, issued a statement calling the compromise "the start of a conversation about how we can ensure a living wage for residents in Massachusetts."

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Local News

AP Video
Netanyahu Vows to Destroy Hamas Tunnels Obama Slams Republicans Over Lawsuit House Leaders Trade Blame for Inaction Malaysian PM: Stop Fighting in Ukraine Cantor Warns of Instability, Terror in Farewell Ravens' Ray Rice: 'I Made a Huge Mistake' Florida Panther Rebound Upsets Ranchers Small Plane Crash in San Diego Parking Lot Busy Franco's Not Afraid of Overexposure Fighting Blocks Access to Ukraine Crash Site Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida Workers Dig for Survivors After India Landslide Texas Scientists Study Ebola Virus Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow Southern Accent Reduction Class Cancelled in TN
Comments Tracker