SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Local News

March 9, 2008

A case study in beach replenishment

(Continued)

According to the city of Venice Web site, "(t)he federally funded beach project added 250 feet seaward ... with the intention of having 150 feet left above water after the first several storms came through."

Venice also secured an agreement with the Army Corps of Engineers to replenish the beach again every 10 years for a 50-year period.

In 2005, the Corps embarked on a $12.1 million project that deposited one million cubic yards of sand along 3.3 miles of shoreline, adding 130 to 160 feet of width to the beach. The city and state jointly paid $2 million of the total.

Marlowe is still retained by the city of Venice.

"Basically, Mr. Marlowe enhances our ability to have a presence in Washington, D.C.," said Venice's public information officer, Pam Johnson. "Our congressional delegation has been active as well, but having Mr. Marlowe up there on a regular basis, meeting with people, helps us to keep a presence."

Venice pays Marlowe & Co. $3,600 to $3,700 per month on a contract that is up for annual renewal. The City Council has renewed it each year since Marlowe helped Venice win that first beach renourishment "earmark."

"We have an agreement with the Army Corps of Engineers to rebuild our beach every 10 years, but the funding has to be obtained each time," Johnson said.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Local News

AP Video
Renewed Violence Taking Toll on Gaza Residents 2 Americans Detained in North Korea Seek Help US Employers Add 209K Jobs, Rate 6.2 Pct House GOP Optimistic About New Border Bill Gaza Truce Unravels; Israel, Hamas Trade Blame Raw: Tunisia Closes Borders With Libya Four Rescued From Crashed Plane Couple Channel Grief Into Soldiers' Retreat WWI Aviation Still Alive at Aerodrome in NY Raw: Rescuers at Taiwan Explosion Scene Raw: Woman Who Faced Death Over Faith in N.H. Clinton Before 9-11: Could Have Killed Bin Laden Netanyahu Vows to Destroy Hamas Tunnels Obama Slams Republicans Over Lawsuit House Leaders Trade Blame for Inaction
Comments Tracker