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Nation/World

February 19, 2014

Shortage of execution drugs becomes more acute

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The nation’s shortage of execution drugs is becoming increasingly acute as more compounding pharmacies conclude that supplying the lethal chemicals is not worth the bad publicity and the legal and ethical risks.

The scarcity of drugs for lethal injections has forced states to scramble for substitutes. And experts say that whatever alternatives are found will almost certainly face costly court challenges made more complicated by laws that cloak the process in secrecy.

On Monday, the Tulsa, Okla.-based compounding pharmacy the Apothecary Shoppe agreed to stop selling pentobarbital to the Missouri Department of Corrections after the pharmacy was named in a lawsuit filed by death row inmate Michael Taylor alleging that the drug could cause “inhumane pain.”

Missouri previously paid $8,000 in cash for each dose of the drug. The settlement will probably mean changing delicate execution procedures just a week before Taylor is scheduled to die for raping and killing a 15-year-old Kansas City girl in 1989. Gov. Jay Nixon said yesterday that Missouri is prepared to carry out the Feb. 26 execution but declined to elaborate.

Messages left with spokesmen for the corrections department were not returned. The Apothecary Shoppe declined interview requests or to answer emailed questions.

Missouri, like many states, is reluctant to divulge much information about how, or where, it obtains lethal injection drugs, citing the privacy rights of the supplier.

Lethal injection has faced increasing scrutiny over the past decade. Major drug makers, many of them based in Europe with longtime opposition to the death penalty, have stopped selling to prisons and corrections departments. The source of the drugs is moving to the forefront of the death penalty debate.

Compounding pharmacies — which custom-mix prescription drugs for doctors and patients — seemed like the answer. They are generally overseen by state boards, not the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, although a law adopted last year allows larger compounding pharmacies to register with the FDA and submit to federal inspections.

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