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Nation/World

March 25, 2014

Race is on to find airliner's black boxes

CANBERRA, Australia — Time is running out to find the crucial keys that could solve the mystery of how and why Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went down.

After the excruciating 17-day wait for confirmation that the Boeing 777 crashed into the southern Indian Ocean, searchers are racing to locate the so-called black boxes before a battery-powered ping they emit fades away.

By law, the boxes must be able to send those signals for at least 30 days following a crash. But experts say they can continue making noise for another 15 days or so beyond that, depending upon the strength of the black box battery at the time of the crash.

Without the black boxes — the common name for the voice and data recorders normally attached to a fuselage — it would be virtually impossible for investigators to definitively say what caused the crash.

Now that some debris has possibly been found, here’s what comes next:

NEEDLE IN A HAYSTACK:

The location of the plane is still unknown more than two weeks after it crashed, although Malaysian authorities say a British satellite company has pinpointed its last position in the Indian Ocean, where several countries have reported finding floating debris.

It’s now up to experts in ocean currents and weather patterns to give searchers their best estimate on where the plane actually went down, which is where the black boxes — they’re really red cylinders — are likely to be located.

“We’ve got to get lucky,” said John Goglia, a former member of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. “It’s a race to get to the area in time to catch the black box pinger while it’s still working.”

To “catch” the signal, searchers will be putting to use a high-tech listening device loaned by the U.S. Navy.

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