SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Nation/World

October 14, 2013

Shutdown driving debate over role of government

WASHINGTON — The lingering federal shutdown is transforming a musty debate over the role of government in America into a coast-to-coast, prime-time reality show.

With landmarks closed, paychecks delayed and workers furloughed, Americans are drawing dueling lessons from the rippling effects of the partial shutdown: The disruptions show that the feds are way too involved in people’s lives or that the government does a lot of vital things that people take for granted.

There’s a messaging war underway to see which viewpoint will prevail. But any shift in public opinion also may well hinge on how much, or how little, people are personally affected as the shutdown drags on.

“It definitely has brought to life what’s going on,” says Pamela Jones, a lawyer from Richmond, Calif., who’s noticing the shutdown’s effects all around her, in closed national parks, disrupted weddings, shuttered restaurants and “life moments and events destroyed.”

Jones, 54, a Democrat and fiscal conservative, finds herself torn in the too-much, too-little debate over the federal government, and says the shutdown at least is giving “more information to the common man, so to speak.”

Jim Chenye, a former marketing manager in Birmingham, Ala., sees no argument for the importance of government in the shutdown’s rippling effects.

“I’m never an advocate of a larger federal government,” says Chenye, 64, a Republican. The shutdown and debt ceiling debate show the government’s broken, Chenye says, but he figures the annoyances of the moment will be long forgotten before people vote in the 2016 elections.

Politicians of all stripes are trying to use the shutdown to buttress long-held positions on the role of the federal government.

Arguing for an activist government, President Barack Obama talks up the plight of hard-working federal workers and the importance of government loans to farmers and small businesses. He laments the shuttered monuments and locked offices, the benefit checks delayed, the veterans awaiting help, the little kids who’ve “been sent home from the safe places where they learn and grow every single day.”

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