SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Nation/World

October 5, 2012

Outbreak spotlights risks from custom-mixed drugs

Two people blinded in Washington, D.C., in 2005. Three dead in Virginia in 2006 and three more in Oregon the following year. Twenty-one dead polo horses in Florida in 2009. Earlier this year, 33 people in seven states with fungal eye infections.

And now, at least five people dead and 35 sickened with fungal meningitis that has been linked to steroid shots for back pain.

All these disasters involved medicines that had been custom-mixed at what are called “compounding pharmacies” — laboratories that supply hospitals, clinics and doctors to a much wider degree in the U.S. than many people realize.

These pharmacies mix solutions, creams and other medicines used to treat everything from menopause symptoms and back pain to vision loss and cancer. Unlike manufactured drugs, these products are not subject to approval by the Food and Drug Administration. And some have turned out to be dangerously contaminated.

Compounding pharmacies often obtain drugs from manufacturers and then split them into smaller doses, or mix ingredients sold in bulk. Any of those steps can easily lead to contamination if sterile conditions aren’t maintained. For example, the fungus suspected in the current meningitis outbreak can spread in the air.

The risks from these products have long been known but are being amplified now by a national shortage of many drugs that has forced doctors to seek custom-made alternatives to the usual first-choice treatments. The steroid suspected in the current outbreak has been in short supply.

“Because of the incredible number of drugs that are out of stock or back-ordered, compounding pharmacies are working with local hospitals, clinics and physicians to fill that gap,” said David Miller, executive vice president of the International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists, a trade organization.

These products have had remarkable growth. More than 7,500 compounding pharmacies operate in the U.S., up from 5,000 in 2009, Miller said. They account for a $3 billion segment of the drug market and 3 percent of all prescriptions filled.

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