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Nation/World

January 19, 2013

Order could restart gun violence studies

(Continued)

“The answer wasn’t taking away cars,” said Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association.

However, while much is known about vehicles and victims in crashes, similar details are lacking about gun violence.

Some unknowns:

— How many people own firearms in various cities and what types.

— What states have the highest proportion of gun ownership.

— Whether gun ownership correlates with homicide rates in a city.

— How many guns used in homicides were bought legally.

— Where juveniles involved in gun fatalities got their weapons.

— What factors contribute to mass shootings like the Newtown, Conn., one that killed 26 people at a school.

“If an airplane crashed today with 20 children and 6 adults there would be a full-scale investigation of the causes and it would be linked to previous research,” said Dr. Stephen Hargarten, director of the Injury Research Center at the Medical College of Wisconsin.

“There’s no such system that’s comparable to that” for gun violence, he said.

One reason is changes pushed by the National Rifle Association and its allies in 1996, a few years after a major study showed that people who lived in homes with firearms were more likely to be homicide or suicide victims. A rule tacked onto appropriations for the Department of Health and Human Services barred use of funds for “the advocacy or promotion of gun control.”

Also, at the gun group’s urging, U.S. Rep. Jay Dickey, a Republican from Arkansas, led an effort to remove $2.6 million from the CDC’s injury prevention center, which had led most of the research on guns. The money was later restored but earmarked for brain injury research.

“What the NRA did was basically terrorize the research community and terrorize the CDC,” said Dr. Mark Rosenberg, who headed the CDC’s injury center at the time. “They went after the researchers, they went after institutions, they went after CDC in a very big way,” he said. “They didn’t want the data to be collected because they were threatened by what the data were showing.”

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