SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Nation/World

September 28, 2013

Shutdown impact: Tourists, homebuyers hit quickly

WASHINGTON — If the government “shuts down” Tuesday, your mail will still come. Doctors will see Medicare patients. NASA will keep talking to the astronauts circling Earth on the Space Station. In fact, the majority of government will remain on the job.

The closings would hit random Americans first: vacationers hoping to take in Mount Rushmore or a Smithsonian museum. Homebuyers seeking government-backed mortgages. Veterans appealing the denial of disability benefits. Perhaps on the bright side — for some — tax audits would be suspended.

Troubles would spread the longer a shutdown lasted.

A prolonged furlough of more than one-third of civilian federal workers could mean delays in processing applications for new Social Security disability claims. Lost profits for businesses that sell goods or services to the government. Problems for hotels and restaurants that rely on tourism near national parks. Longer waits for kids seeking delinquent child support.

And, of course, a shutdown would mean no paychecks for an estimated 800,000 furloughed workers. They might get paid later for the missed days but couldn’t count on that. Don’t blame them for slacking off; the law forbids volunteering to work for free from home.

Kaitlin Thomas, who toured the National Museum of American History yesterday, found the whole thing a little annoying.

“If the public is paying for this, why are they shutting it down?” said Thomas, visiting from New York City.

The deadline nearing, a government of more than 2.1 million civilian employees scrambled yesterday to update its plans determining who would stay and who would go home, what would get done and what would have to wait. The equation was complicated by the complexity of federal budget rules; some pots of money would be caught up in a shutdown and some wouldn’t.

Ironically, a shutdown would have virtually no impact on President Barack Obama’s health care law — the program at the heart of his showdown with House Republicans. The program that detractors dubbed “Obamacare” is set to roll out its individual insurance plans on Tuesday, government shutdown or no, and people hoping to sign up on that first day shouldn’t be affected.

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