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Nation/World

July 22, 2013

Toyota sudden acceleration case set to begin in Calif.

LOS ANGELES — Noriko Uno was afraid of driving fast, often avoiding the freeway and taking the same route every day from her Upland home to and from her family’s sushi restaurant. She had put only 10,000 miles on her 2006 Camry in about four years.

So when her car unexpectedly accelerated to speeds up to 100 mph on a street with a posted limit of 30, the 66-year-old bookkeeper did everything she could to slow down, stepping on the brake pedal and pulling the emergency brake handle as she swerved to avoid other vehicles.

Uno was killed when her car went onto a median and struck a telephone pole and a tree.

Hers is the first so-called “bellwether” case to go to trial that could determine whether Toyota Motor Corp. should be held liable for sudden unintended acceleration in its vehicles — a claim made by motorists that plagued the Japanese automaker and led to lawsuits, settlements and recalls of millions of its cars and SUVs.

“Toyota decided to make safety an option instead of a standard on their vehicles,” said attorney Garo Mardirossian, who is representing Uno’s husband and son. “They decided to save a few bucks, and by doing so, it cost lives.”

Toyota has said there was no defect in Uno’s Camry. The automaker has blamed such crashes on accelerators that got stuck, floor mats that trapped the gas pedal and driver error. The company has settled some wrongful death cases and agreed to pay more than $1 billion to resolve lawsuits where owners said the value of their vehicles plummeted after Toyota’s recalls because of sudden-acceleration concerns.

The Uno trial, starting with jury selection today, is expected to last two months. The proceeding represents the first of the bellwether cases in state courts, which are chosen by a judge to help predict the potential outcome of other lawsuits making similar claims.

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