SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Opinion

January 3, 2014

Column: Why I’m ‘settling’ as a small-town journalist

Finally, after a long semester, I am home for Christmas in Peterborough, N.H. — the inspiration for Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town.” I spend most of my time next to the fire, inching as close as I possibly can before the heat is too much to bear. The view from every window is the same — trees. There are no sirens, no honking, just the occasional sound of snow falling from the roof.

On the coffee table sits a stack of newspapers, editions of the biweekly Monadnock Ledger. As I peruse the headlines, I’m not surprised to see things haven’t changed. A feature on the local food pantry, ornament decorating at the library, the police chief’s retirement, the high school’s ski club.

Too often, people look at me with skepticism when I tell them I want to be a print journalist. “Isn’t that a dying industry?” they ask. And they do have some ground to stand on. Many of us studying journalism have heard more than once how metropolitan papers around the country are being bought out or declaring bankruptcy.

The real misconception people seem to have about journalism, however, is that it is a primarily urban career. “So you’re going to move to Boston, then?” they ask.

“No,” I answer. Then, they usually make some sugar-coated comment about how I’m squandering my college degree, not reaching my full potential, “settling” for less than the best when I tell them I want to be a community reporter. But what is the best?

Among my friends and family, it is unheard of not to subscribe to the Ledger. It is one of nearly 7,500 community newspapers in the United States with circulation under 30,000 that are still alive and thriving, according to a Stanford University report. How ironic that these journalists “settling” for working at a local paper have more job security than those at prestigious urban papers.

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