SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Opinion

April 1, 2013

Our view: Knives still pose a threat

The often maligned airport security folks have a daunting job scanning and X-raying millions of passengers and luggage every day in America’s airports, all in an attempt to keep us safe. The time and hassles for passengers makes the flying experience less fun and more stressful.

So you might have expected the public to be happy when federal safety officials announced that they were going to make changes to carry-on policies that would free up guards’ time to look for the largest threats and to speed the security process.

But when the Transportation Safety Administration said it was going to now allow people to carry small knives onto planes, the announcement brought mostly puzzlement and shock from the public and Congress.

Since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, knives have been prohibited in airline cabins, along with box cutters, larger containers of liquids and a host of other items that could be used for mischief.

The change also will permit passengers to carry on sports equipment, including hockey sticks, shorter souvenir baseball bats and golf clubs.

The TSA says small knives don’t pose serious threats, and they’d like their screeners to concentrate more on the biggest threat — explosive devices. And they say the relaxed restrictions, to take effect in late April, are in line with international flight rules.

It’s a bad idea that was badly decided by the TSA, which failed to even get input from flight attendant and pilot unions — groups both staunchly opposed to the relaxed standards.

Mike Low, father of flight attendant Sara Elizabeth Low, earlier this week released a letter through the flight attendants union asking that the policy change be overturned.

“On the morning of September 11, 2001, our Sara Elizabeth was working business class on American Airlines Flight 11 out of Boston,” Low wrote. “She had to have witnessed in part or all, the stabbing of flight attendants and the murder of a passenger and the pilots, all by knives. Sara spent the last 30 minutes of her life performing her duties amidst that carnage.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Opinion

AP Video
Disbanding Muslim Surveillance Draws Praise Hundreds Missing After South Korean Ferry Sinks Passengers Abuzz After Plane Hits Swarm of Bees Boston Bomb Scare Defendant Appears in Court Pistorius Trial: Adjourned Until May 5 Diaz Gets Physical for New Comedy Raw: Ferry Sinks Off South Korean Coast Town, Victims Remember Texas Blast Freeze Leaves Florida Panhandle With Dead Trees At Boston Marathon, a Chance to Finally Finish Are School Dress Codes Too Strict? Raw: Fatal Ferry Boat Accident Suspicious Bags Found Near Marathon Finish Line Boston Marks the 1st Anniversary of Bombing NYPD Ends Muslim Surveillance Program 8-year-old Boy Gets His Wish: Fly Like Iron Man Sex Offenders Arrested in Slayings of CA Women India's Transgenders Celebrate Historic Ruling Tributes Mark Boston Bombing Anniversary Raw: Kan. Shooting Suspect Faces Judge
Comments Tracker
Roll Call
Helium debate
Helium