SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Opinion

July 24, 2013

Our view: Fed panel's provisions beyond cash are key to fisheries

It’s too early to tell whether all or any of the long-overdue economic disaster aid for the Northeast and other groundfisheries, forced by NOAA’s own actions into a state of recognized “economic disaster,” holds up through the fiscal 2014 federal budget process.

And while the $150 million in disaster aid approved through a key U.S. Senate Appropriations subcommittee and the full committee itself is justified, it’s also easy to see other senators and leaders in the Republican-controlled House picking apart that dollar figure, especially in these times of spending “sequestration.”

But regardless of whatever financial aid package emerges from these appropriation talks — geared toward the next federal fiscal year, which starts Oct. 1 and runs through the following September — it is other provisions within the same bill that set the stage for several positive steps forward.

And while a provision aimed at shutting down NOAA’s 200-job Northeast Regional headquarters in Gloucester is concerning, requirements for NOAA to charter fishing boats to carry out fish stock assessments, mandates for the agency to cover the cost of all on-board monitors under its own poorly managed and wasteful program, and an order to steer a percentage of seafood import tariff revenues toward community-based efforts to modernize fishing fleets are precisely the steps that should be forthcoming from Congress — and, in fact, should have been tied to NOAA’s budget contingencies long ago. So, we can only hope they get the broad-based support on both the House and Senate floors that they deserve.

None of these ideas, of course, are new.

State and federal lawmakers have individually tried to force NOAA’s hand regarding the seafood tariff money, with Congressman John Tierney filing bills in both 2012 and this year to steer a percentage of that money into fisheries. And the 1954 Saltonstall-Kennedy Act has mandated for nearly 60 years that 30 percent of the cash reeled in from seafood imports — now an embarrassing 90 percent of the U.S. seafood market, thanks again to our own government’s catch regulations — be given by the Department of Agriculture to the Department of Commerce — and that Commerce use at least 60 percent of that stash for “fishery industry projects.”

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Opinion

AP Video
Judge Ponders Overturning Colo. Gay Marriage Ban Airlines Halt Travel to Israel Amid Violence NYPD Chief Calls for 'use of Force' Retraining VA Nominee McDonald Goes Before Congress Bush: Don't Worry, Sugarland Isn't Breaking Up US Official: Most Migrant Children to Be Removed Police Probing Brooklyn Bridge Flag Switch CDC Head Concerned About a Post-antibiotic Era Raw: First Lady Says `Drink Up' More Water Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law Holder Urges Bipartisanship on Immigration Raw: Truck, Train Crash Leads to Fireball US Airlines Cancel Israel Flights Obama Signs Workforce Training Law Crash Victims' Remains Reach Ukraine-held City Diplomatic Push Intensifies to End War in Gaza Cat Fans Lap Up Feline Film Festival Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die Veteran Creates Job During High Unemployment
Comments Tracker
Roll Call
Helium debate
Helium