SalemNews.com, Salem, MA

Opinion

January 29, 2013

Our view: Politicians promise wonders while they’re reaching for your wallets

Politicians, like pickpockets, know that misdirection is the key to success.

Pickpockets know that a bump to the shoulder or chest draws the mark’s attention away from the pocket where his money is.

The politician’s weapons of mass distraction are his or her words. When a politician begins to spin a tale about how new “investments” are needed and will be “targeted” to one specific and noble cause, watch your wallets. They’re about to be lifted.

A story in our sister paper, The Eagle-Tribune, on Sunday illustrates this principle well.

Remember how we were promised that all the money states reaped from Big Tobacco was going to be targeted toward anti-smoking advertising, quit-smoking hotlines and similar treatment programs? Aren’t tobacco taxes supposed to support similar measures? That’s surely the pitch we get every time legislators try to raise them.

The New England Center for Investigative Reporting, a nonprofit investigative reporting newsroom based at Boston University, has found that less than 1 percent of the tobacco money coming to Massachusetts is used to support anti-smoking efforts. The rest — 99 percent — goes into the general fund.

We’re talking serious money here. Massachusetts got $254 million in tobacco settlement money in 2012 and raked in $561 million in tobacco taxes. Yet of that $815 million, the state will spend just $4.2 million in 2013 on smoking cessation and prevention programs, NECIR’s Beverly Ford reported.

And the need is great. Ford reports Centers for Disease Control and Prevention figures that show that more than 9,000 Massachusetts residents die annually from smoking-related diseases and yearly health care costs associated with treating tobacco-related illnesses in the state have risen to $3.9 billion.

The CDC estimates that it would take $90 million to fully fund cessation and prevention efforts in Massachusetts. The $4.2 million the state is spending is just 4.6 percent of what’s needed to meet the CDC standard.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Opinion

AP Video
Raw: Japanese Soldiers Storm Beach in Exercises Raw: Weapons Fire Hits UN School in Gaza Raw: Rocket Launches Into Space With Cargo Ship Broken Water Main Floods UCLA Two Women Narrowly Avoid Being Hit by Train In Virginia, the Rise of a New Space Coast New Sanctions on Key Sectors of Russian Economy Crayola Announces Family Attraction in Orlando US Ready to Slap New Sanctions on Russia Kerry: Not Worried About Israeli Criticism Boater Rescued From Edge of Kentucky Dam Girl Struck by Plane on Florida Beach Dies Rodents Rampant in Gardens Around Louvre House to Vote on Slimmed-down Bill for Border Looming Demand Could Undercut Flight Safety Raw: 2 Shells Hit Fuel Tank at Gaza Power Plant Raw: Massive Explosions From Airstrikes in Gaza Giant Ketchup Bottle Water Tower Up for Sale Easier Nuclear Construction Promises Fall Short Kerry: Humanitarian Cease-fire Efforts Continue
Comments Tracker
Roll Call
Helium debate
Helium