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AP

House investigators are unlikely to call former President Donald Trump to testify about his role in the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection. That's according to Mississippi Rep. Bennie Thompson, the Democratic chairman of the nine-member panel investigating the attack. Thompson says they don't expect to call Trump, whose supporters broke into the U.S. Capitol and interrupted the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory. Thompson said the panel hasn’t made any final decisions, “but there’s no feeling among the committee to call him as a witness at this point.” The Jan. 6 panel plans to hold public hearings in June.

AP

John Roberts is heading a Supreme Court in crisis. The chief justice has already ordered an investigation into the unprecedented leak this week of a draft of a major abortion opinion. What comes next could further test Roberts’ leadership of a court. The addition of three conservative justices during Donald Trump’s presidency means there are now five conservative justices to Roberts’ right who no longer need his vote, and perhaps his moderating influence, to prevail in a case. The abortion decision could be another example of that, with the court’s other conservatives prepared to go further than Roberts. He's said repeatedly that he prefers decisions where the court comes to a broad agreement on narrow grounds.

AP

FILE - Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts departs at the end of the day in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2020. Roberts is heading a Supreme Court in crisis. The chief justice has already ordered an investigation into the unprecedented leak earlier this week of a draft of a major abortion opinion. What comes next could further test Roberts’ leadership of a court. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

AP

FILE - Members of the Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington, April 23, 2021. Seated from left are Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer and Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left are Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh, Associate Justice Elena Kagan, Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch and Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

AP
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FILE - Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts arrives at the Capitol to preside over the Impeachment Trial of President Donald Trump, in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. Roberts is heading a Supreme Court in crisis. The chief justice has already ordered an investigation into the unprecedented leak earlier this week of a draft of a major abortion opinion. What comes next could further test Roberts’ leadership of a court. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

AP
  • Updated

Demonstrator walk to a protest outside of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, May 4, 2022, in Washington. A draft opinion suggests the U.S. Supreme Court could be poised to overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade case that legalized abortion nationwide, according to a Politico report released Monday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

AP
  • Updated

Demonstrators protest outside of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, May 4, 2022, in Washington. A draft opinion suggests the U.S. Supreme Court could be poised to overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade case that legalized abortion nationwide, according to a Politico report released Monday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

AP
  • Updated

The U.S. Supreme Court building is shown Wednesday, May 4, 2022 in Washington. A draft opinion suggests the U.S. Supreme Court could be poised to overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade case that legalized abortion nationwide, according to a Politico report released Monday. Whatever the outcome, the Politico report represents an extremely rare breach of the court's secretive deliberation process, and on a case of surpassing importance. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

AP

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell was banned from Twitter for a second time after attempting to use a new account to access the social media platform. Lindell set up a new account on Twitter on Sunday under @MikeJLindell. But the account was quickly suspended. Twitter said in a statement that Lindell’s new account was permanently suspended for violating its rules on ban evasion.

AP

Mike Lindell, chief executive officer of MyPillow, talks to reporters before attending a rally outside the State Capitol, April 5, 2022, in downtown Denver. Lindell was banned from Twitter for a second time after attempting to use a new account to access the social media platform. Lindell set up a new account on Twitter on Sunday, May 1, 2022 under @MikeJLindell. But the account was quickly suspended. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)