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In this Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021, photo, Chris Olachia walks past a nearly completed human body composting vessel in Arvada, Colo. On Sept. 7, Colorado became the second state after Washington to allow human body composting, and Oregon will allow the practice beginning next July. The vessel will be packed with wood chips and straw and will be able to compost a body in six months. About the size of a standard grave, the rectangular insulated wooden box is lined with waterproof roofing material and packed with wood chips and straw. Two large spool wheels on either end allow it to be rolled across the floor, providing the oxygenation, agitation and absorption required for a body to compost. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)

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In this Friday, Aug. 27, 2021., photo, a sample of a composted pig sits on a table at The Natural Funeral in Lafayette, Colo. The company is offering human body composting after Colorado became the second state after Washington to legalize the practice. By the end of the six-month process, the body, the wood chips and the straw will have broken down into enough soil to fill the bed of a pickup truck. Family members can keep the soil to spread in their yards, but Colorado law forbids selling it and using it commercially to grow food for human consumption. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)

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In this Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021, photo, employee Chris Olachia works on a nearly completed human body composting vessel in Arvada, Colo. On Sept. 7, Colorado became the second state after Washington to allow human body composting, and Oregon will allow the practice beginning next July. The vessel will be packed with wood chips and straw and will be able to compost a body in six months. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)

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In this Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021, photo, employee Chris Olachia shows a handful of teeth at The Natural Funeral's human body composting facility in Arvada, Colo. On Sept. 7, Colorado became the second state after Washington to allow human body composting, and Oregon will allow the practice beginning next July. Vessels will be packed with wood chips and straw and will compost a body in six months. Teeth are removed during cremation and composting to prevent mercury contained in dental fillings from contaminating the environment. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)

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Micah Truman, CEO of Return Home, a company that composts human remains into soil, poses for a photo, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in Auburn, Wash., south of Seattle. Truman is holding a container of soil made with animal remains that is used to show what the product of their process looks like. Behind him are the metal vessels where bodies are kept during the first month of the two-month composing process. Earlier in September, Colorado became the second state after Washington to allow human body composting, and Oregon will allow the practice beginning next July. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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This Wednesday, Friday, Aug. 27, 2021, photo shows a viewing area at The Natural Funeral in Lafayette, Colo. After Colorado became the second state after Washington, the company is offering human body composting to legalize the practice. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)

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A container of compost produced from human remains is shown at Recompose, a company that composts human remains into soil, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in Kent, Wash., south of Seattle. Earlier in September, Colorado became the second state after Washington to allow human body composting, and Oregon will allow the practice beginning next July. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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In this Friday, Aug. 27, 2021, photo, urns are displayed in a window at The Natural Funeral in Lafayette, Colo. The company is offering human body composting after Colorado became the second state after Washington to legalize the practice. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)